Coronavirus: News & impact on our UWCEA community - Click Here

Coronavirus


This page has been created to carry announcements and information that may benefit the UWCEA community regarding the pandemic of Covid-19, and will be updated whenever new information is available.

This page was last updated on 6 July 2020
No official data on Covid19 in mainland Tanzania has been published for over 2 months since the last official statement on 29th April.
 

News

With Tanzanian schools now back in regular session, the government has issued guidelines for student use of face masks – see below.
 

Flights

Qatar Airways is commencing flights from KIA three times per week from 13th July.
KLM is now flying from Dar es Salaam and they are expected to start flights from Kilimanjaro in August.
Egypt Air is re-starting flights from Dar on 19th July.
Ethiopian Airlines is currently flying from KIA on Monday, Thursday and Saturday.

 

Schools and UWCEA

Tanzanian schools were closed by the government for three months and re-opened on Monday, 29th June. UWCEA is currently on our regular July/August holiday. Classes at UWCEA for the new school year 2020/21 will start on Monday, 10th August, with residential students arriving before this.

Universities and colleges re-opened on 1st June 2020 and Tanzanian form six students in national schools returned to school on 1st June.

Image: Ministry of Health

Uplifting video from the Tanzania Tourist Board:


 
This page aims to give information to our community. If you can help with relevant, verified information on the coronavirus outbreak that is pertinent to Tanzania and/or our UWCEA community, please send it to webmaster@uwcea.com.

Face Masks in Schools

The Ministry of Health has issued the following guidance on student use of face masks in school:
The Government through the Ministry of Health, Social Development, Gender, Elderly and Children, in consultation with the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology, issued the Second Guide (25 June 2020) for infection control of CORONA (COVID-19) disease in students. As well as providing education in relation to this guide, we would like to further elaborate on the issue of the use of face masks for students so as to be better understood by students, teachers and the public;

1. The guide directs students to use the face mask in a crowded environment.
2. Students in the following groups are directed not to use a facemask:
a) All children under the age of 8
b) All students (even if he is over 8 years) with health problems such as Respiratory Systemic diseases (Asthma), Heart problems, Selimundu (Sickle) Cell Disease) and those whose history in school leadership indicates they have health problems that can affect breathing.
In addition, students should not wear masks during sports or while doing other exercises, including running and running.
Students with diabetes, high blood pressure, obesity and kidney problems, wear them but be closely monitored.
Class teachers and Principals are directed to be close to the students in following the instructions in this guide and to report in advance where the student is experiencing any problems such as breathing, numbness or coughing.

Despite the scientific experience we have in connection with this disease, and with respect to our environment, the Ministry will continue to closely monitor the implementation of the Guidelines on the proper use of face masks for students including the challenges that arise. In addition, education stakeholders, parents and guardians are welcome to comment on the implementation of the manual should it be improved to protect the students.

This guidance as published in Kiswahili on 28th June.

The following recently issued documents may also be useful for reference:
Payment of School Fees (English) - 26 June
Payment of School Fees (Swahili) - 26 June

Guide for Schools on Reopening (English) - 27 May
Guide for Schools on Reopening (Swahili) - 27 May

Government Documents re Covid-19


May 18: Travel Advisory No 3 (English).

Apr 24: Immigration statement on visas and permits

May 7: Min of Health Zanzibar statement (Swahili).

May 6: Min of Health - Detailed statistical report for Zanzibar (English).

May 3: Min of Health - Beware of fake medicines (Swahili).

Covid-19: Standard Operating Procedures (Mar 2020).

Covid-19: Admissions & Discharge Process.

Covid-19: Guidelines for Clinical Management (Draft Jan 2020).

April 29: Prime Minister statement (Swahili).

April 29: Prime Minister statement (English translation).

April 28: Minister of Health Zanzibar statement (Swahili).

April 24: Minister of Health Zanzibar statement (Swahili).

April 22: Prime Minister statement (Swahili).

April 22: Prime Minister statement (English translation).

April 22: Minister of Health Zanzibar statement (Swahili).

April 20: Minister of Health Zanzibar statement (Swahili).

April 20: Minister of Health statement (Swahili).

April 19: Minister of Health Zanzibar statement (Swahili).

April 18: Ministry of Health statement on donations (Swahili).

April 17: Minister of Health statement (Swahili).

April 16: Minister of Health Zanzibar statement (Swahili).

April 15: Minister of Health statement (Swahili).

April 14: Prime Minister's Statement (Swahili)

April 14: Prime Minister's Statement (English translation)

April 13: Minister of Health statement (Swahili).

April 10: Minister of Health statement (English translation).

April 10: Minister of Health statement (Swahili).

April 8: Ministry of Health statement (Swahili).

April 7: Ministry of Health statement (Swahili).

April 6: Minister of Health statement (Swahili).

April 6: Minister of Health statement (English translation).

April 4: Travel Advisory No 2 - Freight (Swahili).

April 4: Travel Advisory No 2 - Freight (English).

April 2: Immigration statement on visas and permits (English)

April 1: Minister of Health statement (Swahili).

March 31: Minister of Health statement (Swahili).

March 30: Minister of Health statement (Swahili).

March 26: Minister of Health statement (Swahili).

March 26: Minister of Health statement (Summary in English).

March 24: Quarantine Guidelines (English).

March 23: Quarantine Hotels in Arusha.

March 23: Quarantine Hotels in Dar.

March 23: Travel Advisory No.1 (English).

IB Covid19 Updates
IST Clinic Advice (Dar)

IST Clinic in Dar es Salaam has published this booklet of advice concerning Covid-19:
Download it here

Aga Khan Hospital (Dar) - Covid19

Yale Social Distancing Study
Should Low Income Countries impose social-distancing like Europe or USA?

"The most widely-cited model of COVID-19 transmission and mortality shows that we should expect fewer deaths in poor countries, and that social distancing policies in these countries produce smaller benefits. ... it remains unclear whether the value of mitigation and suppression policies in poor countries outweighs the uncertain economic costs."

Read more on this study here

Instructions for patients self-quarantining

Guidelines
You have to stay inside your house. You may not go outside. You may sit in your garden or on your balcony if there are no other people there. You are not allowed to receive visitors, except your family doctor and the GGD.

What should you do if you share your house with other people?
Nobody except the people who actually live in your house may enter your house. Your housemates may not receive visitors either.
We have a separate information letter for your housemates, which you will receive by email. Would you make sure that they are aware of this information?
You must stay in your own room as much as possible. This is where you sleep, and you must sleep alone.
The other people living in the house may only enter your room as infrequently as possible.
You must limit your contact with the other people in the house to the greatest extent possible and maintain a distance of 2 metres from one another. So no hugging, no kissing, and no sex!
You must use your own separate cutlery, plates, cups, and glasses.
Also, you may not share a toothbrush with anyone else.
Neither may you share your towels.
If possible, you must use a separate toilet and have a bathroom all to yourself. Do you have only one toilet and bathroom in the house? Then you can share these with your housemates. It is important that the toilet and bathroom are cleaned every day and that the room is ventilated by opening the window for 30 minutes.

Do others have to come into your room?
Maintain a distance of 2 metres between you and your housemates.

Do you have to leave the room?
Maintain a distance of 2 metres between you and your housemates.

How do you ensure good personal hygiene?
Wash your hands regularly with soap and water. Always do this after coughing or sneezing, going to the toilet, or cleaning and tidying up.
If you cough or sneeze:
Use tissues rather than cloth handkerchiefs. Don’t have any tissues at hand? Cough and sneeze into the inside of your elbow.
Use a tissue only once and discard it in a plastic bag after use.

How do you maintain good hygiene in the house?
Stay in a separate room as much as possible.
Also open a window a few times a day in the rooms where you are staying. This will allow fresh air to come in.

Clean the bathroom and toilet every day.
Before you start, put on a pair of disposable gloves.
Clean with an ordinary household detergent.
Include taps, light switches and door handles.
When you are finished, put the cleaning cloth directly into the wash.
Remove your gloves and throw them in a plastic rubbish bag.
Wash your hands afterwards with soap and water.

Clean frequently used surfaces every day.
These are surfaces that are frequently touched, such as bedside tables, door handles and light switches.
Before you start, put on a pair of disposable gloves.
Start by cleaning everything with an ordinary household detergent.
Next, clean all items that are frequently touched, such as flush handles, door handles and light switches with household bleach.
Use a fresh bucket filled with 5 litres of water for this. Stir in 125 millilitres of bleach (about a coffee cup). Bleach water is available in all supermarkets.
When you are finished, put the cleaning cloth directly into the wash.
Remove your gloves and throw them in a plastic rubbish bag.
Wash your hands afterwards with soap and water.

Avoid dispersion of body fluids such as stools, spit, snot, sweat, and urine.
Housemates must wear gloves that they can throw away when entering your room, when doing laundry or dishes, or when disposing any waste that you have used.
Put your laundry in a separate laundry basket and wash it at a temperature of 60 degrees at minimum, with a full programme and normal detergent.
Wash your dishes separately with a standard dishwashing detergent and hot water, or in the dishwasher using the longest and hottest programme.
Dispose of your waste in a separate rubbish bag in your own room. Wear gloves when disposing of the rubbish bag. The bag can be put in the normal grey rubbish bin.

[Source: Dutch health authorities]

Instructions for living with a patient

Instruction for persons sharing a house with someone with COVID-19

What do we ask from you?
Nobody except the people who actually live in your house may enter your house. You may not receive visitors.
Avoid spending time in the room where your infected housemate is staying.
You must try to have as little contact as possible with this person. Maintain a distance of at least 2 metres from this person, so do not hug them, kiss them, or have sex with them.
Ensure good personal hygiene and good hygiene in the house. You can read what that means below.
Have your housemate use a separate bathroom and toilet if possible. Do you have only one bathroom and toilet in the house? Then you can share them. It is important that you clean the toilet every day and ventilate the room by opening the window for 30 minutes, if possible.

What if you must be in the same room as your housemate?
Put on disposable gloves before entering the room, if possible.
Maintain a distance of 2 metres between you and your housemate.

After leaving the room:
Remove your disposable gloves.
Dispose of them immediately into a plastic rubbish bag.
Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water.
Dry your hands with a paper towel.

How do you ensure good personal hygiene?
Wash your hands regularly with soap and water. Always do this after coughing or sneezing, going to the toilet, or cleaning and washing dishes.

If you cough or sneeze:
Use tissues rather than cloth handkerchiefs. Don’t have any tissues at hand? Cough and sneeze into the inside of your elbow.
Use a tissue only once and discard it in a plastic bag after use. Wash your hands.

How do you maintain good hygiene in the house?
Make sure your housemate is confined to a separate room as much as possible.
Make sure that the rooms where your housemate comes are regularly ventilated by opening the window for 30 minutes.
Also open a window a few times a day in the rooms where you are staying. This will allow fresh air to come in.

Clean the bathroom and toilet every day.
Include taps, light switches and door handles.
Before you start, put on a pair of disposable gloves.
Clean with an ordinary household detergent.
When you are finished, put the cleaning cloth directly into the wash.
Remove your gloves and throw them in a plastic rubbish bag.
Wash your hands afterwards with soap and water.

Clean frequently used surfaces every day.
These are surfaces that your housemate frequently touches, such as bedside tables, door handles and light switches.
Before you start, put on a pair of disposable gloves.
Start by cleaning everything with an ordinary household detergent.
Next, clean all items touched by your housemate, such as flush handles, door handles and light switches with household bleach.
Use a fresh bucket filled with 5 litres of water for this. Stir in 125 millilitres of bleach (about a coffee cup). You can buy bleach at every supermarket.
When you are finished, put the cleaning cloth directly into the wash.
Remove your gloves and throw them in a plastic rubbish bag.
Wash your hands afterwards with soap and water.

[Source: Dutch health authorities]

World Health Organisation via WhatsApp

WHO information is available via WhatsApp.
Send a WhatsApp message ("hi") to +41 79 893 1892.
To see the menu, send 0 (zero).

UK/US travel advice for Tanzania

On 5th June, the UK updated its information regarding coronavirus in Tanania:
"The Tanzanian government last released numbers on COVID-19 cases or deaths on 29 April.

If you’re in Tanzania, you should continue to take sensible precautions and preventive steps to reduce the risk of infection. Limit your movements and the number of visitors entering your accommodation.

The Government of Tanzania has announced that it is relaxing the ban on public gatherings, university and school openings, and sporting competitions. The majority of hotels, bars and restaurants remain closed for the time being, though many restaurants still offer take away service. You should continue to practice measures recommended by PHE such as hand washing and social distancing.

The Tanzanian Authorities have announced that they will extend the length of visa validity by 1 month free of charge for people who are unable to leave Tanzania due to coronavirus.

Due to a rise in the number of coronavirus cases in Tanzania, medical facilities and personnel are under strain throughout the country. The availability of treatment for non-coronavirus-related illnesses, particularly for non-urgent care, has been adversely impacted. There have been instances during the COVID-19 outbreak when hospitals in Dar es Salaam reached full capacity due to the high volume of COVID-19 cases. Limited hospital capacity throughout Tanzania could result in life-threatening delays for emergency medical care."

You can read the full UK Travel advice section for Tanzania here: UK Travel Advice

June 2nd: Read the US Embassy Health Alert here.

The Department of State advises U.S. citizens to avoid all international travel due to the global impact of COVID-19. In countries where commercial departure options remain available, U.S. citizens who live in the United States should arrange for immediate return to the United States, unless they are prepared to remain abroad for an indefinite period. U.S. citizens who live abroad should avoid all international travel. US Embassies are reducing staff. These departures may limit the ability of U.S. Embassies and consulates to provide services to U.S. citizens.

The US Travel Advisory can be found here.

Zanzibar Notices

These regulations were published for Zanzibar on 23 March:

A rough summary of this in English is:
1. People should quickly shop in markets and leave. Prolonged conversations prohibited.
2. Markets will open from dawn to 6pm
3. All bars, restaurants and recreational centres closed until further notice.
4. Public gatherings not allowed. This includes seminars, weddings and family events. Regional and district authorities to ensure people follow the regulations.

ON 21st March, Zanzibar issued this notice to airlines:

Posters, Reading & other Resources

To help you keep relaxed and healthy, our counselors have put together a list of resources you can use: UWCEA Counselor Resources for Families.



The Association of International Schools in Africa has compiled a list of resources that you may find helpful:


Director's Messages & Archives